1. She shot back in a public post, “Btw, tweeting @irene doesn’t deliver any messages to the hurricane. Sorry.” Her co-workers found that hilarious. Ms. Tien happens to work at digital-media firm Huge Inc., where she and her colleagues help businesses figure out how to communicate through social media—like Twitter. She was on a cruise with her co-workers in Huge’s Los Angeles office when she got an email from her company’s associate creative director, Ross Morrison, with the subject line, “Um … we HAVE to do something with this …” Another co-worker chimed in, “I don’t think Irene has a choice.” “The thing is, it’s a hurricane, it’s sensitive, it’s potentially dangerous and horrible,” Ms. Tien says. “I really didn’t want to be posting that much.” But her colleagues made a case for it. She wouldn’t have to do anything. They would take over her Twitter account and post funny, but useful, updates about the hurricane. She agreed. (She had had a few drinks on the booze cruise but says that had nothing to do with it.) Now, she says, “It adds a bit of levity to the situation, but it also provides accurate information about what to do.”

    — When @Irene Met Hurricane Irene - Digits - WSJ

  2. Twitter Q&A for Hurricane Irene →

    Reading printed out tweets. Love you, CNN.

  3. lancelot-hikes-a-lot:

Hurricane Irene’s Twitter

Yeah, that’s real original. Get back to us when you’re more than 140 characters.

    lancelot-hikes-a-lot:

    Hurricane Irene’s Twitter

    Yeah, that’s real original. Get back to us when you’re more than 140 characters.